Sun Damage | Age Spots

Too much sun exposure can significantly damage human skin. The sun’s heat dries out areas of unprotected skin and depletes the skin’s supply of natural lubricating oils. In addition, the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) radiation can cause burning and long-term changes in the skin’s structure. The most common types of sun damage to the skin are:

Dry skin — Sun-exposed skin can gradually lose moisture and essential oils, making it appear dry, flaky and prematurely wrinkled, even in younger people.


Sunburn — Sunburn is the common name for the skin injury that appears immediately after the skin is exposed to UV radiation. Mild sunburn causes only painful reddening of the skin, but more severe cases can produce tiny fluid-filled bumps (vesicles) or larger blisters.


Actinic keratosis — This is a tiny bump that feels like sandpaper or a small, scaly patch of sun-damaged skin that has a pink, red, yellow or brownish tint. Unlike suntan markings or sunburns, an actinic keratosis does not usually go away unless it is frozen, chemically treated or removed by a doctor. An actinic keratosis develops in areas of skin that have undergone repeated or long-term exposure to the sun’s UV light, and it is a warning sign of increased risk of skin cancer. About 10% to 15% of actinic keratoses eventually change into squamous cell cancers of the skin.


Long-term changes in the skin’s collagen (a structural protein) — These changes include photoaging (premature aging of the skin because of sun exposure) and actinic purpura (bleeding from fragile blood vessels beneath the skin surface). In photoaging, the skin develops wrinkles and fine lines because of changes in the collagen of a deep layer of the skin called the dermis. In actinic purpura, UV radiation damages the structural collagen that supports the walls of the skin’s tiny blood vessels. Particularly in older people, this collagen damage makes blood vessels more fragile and more likely to rupture following a slight impact.

Age spots, also known as liver spots, sun spots, or lentigos, are flat, oval patches of pigmented skin. UVA sunlight stimulates the pigment cells called melanocytes which manufacture this pigment called, melanin. This is not only responsible for a tan but also for unwanted dark patches.

The most common colour is brown, but they can also be red or almost black. These usually occur in adults over 40, but younger people can also get them if they spend a lot of time in the sun. Age spots are completely harmless.

Age Spots are caused by skin ageing, sun damage, sun beds, hormones and genetics. Clients are recommended to book a consultation before considering any treatment. Age spots will fade in the winter and become darker in the summer. There are various treatments that can be carried out to treat them.

Treatments

Skin Peels

The Green Peel®

Laser Skin Rejuvenation

CryoPen

Microdermabrasion

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP)

Skin Needling

Anti-Wrinkle Injections

Dermal Fillers

Obagi Skincare

Epionce Skincare

Celluma LED